Pork Gyoza

Here we gyoz-again.

In our last post, while discussing the most rockin’ sushi rolls around Corpus Christi, we also mentioned our order of deep-fried pork gyoza. Curious about what goes into the Japanese dumpling-making process, we decided to do some research of our own and headed out to the store.

Making it happen

The Process

For the most part, we followed this recipe from Budget Bytes. The best way we can describe this process is not horribly complicated but not easy, either. The most difficult part is the wrapping, so don’t be deterred if it takes you a few tries before you get it right. Our biggest tip (or smallest, depending on how you look at it) is to put a very small amount of meat mixture into the center of the dumpling. This will make wrapping easier and also ensure that you can cook the meat all the way through in the pan without burning the outside shell of the gyoza.

Making the magic happen
More difficult than it looks!

The Results

While we can’t speak to authenticity and won’t pretend to, we will say that this was such a fun process and these gyoza turned out delicious. They had the prime level of crunch and it was so hard to not pop ten of these in our mouths at a time. The filling was tasty and it would be super easy to adjust to your specific tastes. These are, dare we say, better than those from Rock ‘n Roll? Get your favorite hoisin sauce, fish sauce, or soy sauce, and go to town!

The journey to the crunch

What Should You Know Before You Make Pork Gyoza?

  • Some of these ingredients may not be the easiest to find at typical grocery stores. We suggest going to an Asian supermarket for the best quality ingredients, primed and perfect for making gyoza.
  • A quick tip on the wrapping process before you get frustrated: YouTube! There are plenty of gyoza-wrapping videos, but this top result is easy to follow and also has text directions.
  • Pre-made gyoza wrappers are great for the novices like us, but if you’re already a gyoza-making pro, why not step it up a notch? Make your own wrappers with this recipe.
  • If you can’t find round wrappers specifically for making gyoza, don’t fret. The larger square ones will work just fine; all you need to do is use a biscuit cutter for the perfectly-sized circles.
A lineup we can get behind

When Should You Make Pork Gyoza?

We fully recommend making gyoza on a solo date night! Here’s what we mean by that. Gyoza are technically a “small bite,” so an appetizer or snack, and they do take up some pretty good time if you’re not accustomed to making them. Therefore, here’s our idea: treat yourself to some creative, culinary alone time and enjoy the slow, steady process of putting these gyoza together. Pour yourself a glass of Japanese plum wine, order an entree, and be rewarded with your creation.

Once you are accustomed to the process? Making these will fly by and be the perfect bite to take to parties. Skip the veggie tray and bring an entire tray of gyoza!

Rock on, gyoza lovers

The Tunes

Still going strong with f&f 2: sushi & gyoza. These soft rock tunes are the ideal pairing to your solo date. Stay tuned for our next playlist!